Career and Business Consultant. A 23 year Navy veteran with 20 years of progressive experience in brand marketing, career counseling, world travel and veteran consulting. Founder and Co-Owner of MVOSS Creation LLC who manages and directs the following organization - serving the community of Virginia Beach and around the globe: • Mvoss Creation Promotional Products • LifeWise Consulting • Chiefpreneur

Group Session or Group Counseling – Why It’s Effective but How? By Dr. Tony Astro, PhD




In the past few months since I opened my home for some type of faith-based group sessions every Friday then also every Monday joining in another bigger more intense public group – I found some comfort and so is many members of the group.  I think it is not only therapeutic (even as a counselor or listener) to know that you are not alone BUT more importantly with someone who has shoddier experience or situation than I am makes me appreciate the level of comfort of what I’m going through (and vice versa) and be able to contribute our experience to others to give them some insight or comfort.
Here are some observations and ways we can progress in a group session as a participant or if you are a counselor in a group counseling or leader in a group session.

INSTILLATION OF CONFIDENCE & HOPE

Many studies confirm that optimism or positive anticipation are therapeutic and results to positive outcomes. When a client or participant sees a group member who is a fellow alcoholic or have been through bankruptcy or divorce or family casualties (or other life-altering transitions) and has moved on or not drink for months and has better their life – group members or clients associates themselves to their fellow group mate instilling hope.

The inspiration provided to participants by their peers results in substantial improvements in medical outcomes, reduces health care costs, promotes the individual’s sense of self-efficacy, and often makes group intercessions superior to individual therapies (Fawzy, Fawzy and Wheeler, 1996).

UNSELFISHNESS

Kindness or willingness to help gives a sense of satisfaction in many normal individuals. The gratification of being part of a team and sharing the ability to help or giving out aid based on experience - like prior drug addiction, attempted suicides, career transitions and whatever helps will be satisfying to the client or group members.

In a group setting there are many opportunities for the participants or clients with similar experience to share each other similar experiences and with pride gives information to fellow, for instance, one who has the same career transition or addiction with someone who was going through or has gone through may contribute some insight. On the other hand, being called selfish because of not sharing your experience is not healthy for an individual and this kind of self-sacrifice of being transparent helps in a group setting.  Some people may take some time to really speak up and share, let them be quiet for as they need to and not force them to speak.

Group sessions (or therapy) is unique in being the only reconciling remedy that offers clients the opportunity to be of benefit to and from others (Yalom, 2005). It also encourages role versatility, requiring members or clients to shift between roles of help receivers and help providers (Holmes and Kivlighan, 2000).

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP

Everyone needs a connection with someone at any point of life. In my experience as 23-year veteran & Navy counselor, during military deployment, many Sailors suffer from some type of stress because of lack of interaction with others, particularly with family and even fellow personnel due to high stress environment. The feeling of isolation does not help a client if there is a need arise.

The theory of interpersonal relationships has become so much an integral part of the fabric of mental health thought that needs no further underscoring; people need people – for initial and continued survival, for socialization, for the pursuit of satisfaction (Yalom, 2005).

On a group therapy, there is 100% opportunity to interact with someone no matter what personality or issues of the client. A diverse group or a set of people with the same background or issues will set the tone of how the group will get along and interpersonal relationship will play a big role in having a successful group therapy.

BENEFICIAL (THERAPEUTIC) FORCES

If there is lack of confidence in a group and especially with the leader, the interaction and dynamics to get a therapy will not be successful. To be a thriving group, here are 3 Beneficial or Therapeutic Forces (see complete 15 Therapeutic Forces on inserted image) that should be present:
1. Clarity of purpose for the leader and the members.
2. The leader’s attitude.
3. Level of trust among members.



CLARITY OF PURPOSE
Without a clear goal and rationale of why the group exists – there will be no direction and majority of these Beneficial (Therapeutic) Forces will not be possible. For instance, a leader might say the group is educational but spend most of the time doing therapy, or the leader might say the group is for support but spend most of the time focusing on one person or on one topic that is not relevant for most of the members (Jacobs, Masson & Harvill, 2008).

There should be a clear objective and presented to the group members or clients step by step until it is comprehended.

COUNSELOR AND/OR LEADER’S ATTITUDE

The leader (it is also important that the counselor designate a 2nd leader) who facilitates the group has direct key to the success of the group because he or she has the capacity to implement any or all the therapeutic forces that may influence the outcome of the therapy. No matter how small or big the group or how long the session is or even how high the level of trust among the members are – the leader has the full control of the group.

If the group contains hostile, nonvoluntary members, the leader should try to find a way to get these members involved; however, if the members are completely resistant and negative, the leader may need to remove them from the group (Jacobs, Masson & Harvill, 2008).

LEVEL OF TRUST AMONG MEMBERS

Once trust is lost, there is no looking back. There is always at the back of a person's mind that the issues or something else may not be resolve because an expectation or confidence was no longer there, and leader must resolve this fast.

Problems of trust often occur when members have very different points of view and if the group consists of members who do not like each other, the leader can try to change this by bringing it up in the group or by meeting with some members privately to see if their differences can be resolved (Jacobs, Masson & Harvill, 2008).

Each Factor theory from Yalom's Therapeutic Forces, also from Jacob, Masson and Harvill has an important key to all group therapy and can be be applied on a case by case and the importance of one does not mean that one factor is not important.

In any case, Group sessions or therapy or meeting - needs strong accountability and more importantly a binding rule of confidentiality. Everything that happens behind those four walls must stay within the group and everyone's dignity should be protected and gossips should never be tolerated.


Dr. Tony Astro is co-owner of Mvoss Creation Promotional & Consulting located in Town Center Virginia Beach.  His expertise is cultural intelligence, career development and promotional branding. He has 2 decades of experience as human resources supervisor with Department of the Navy as Chief Counselor providing administrative support and training to all hierarchy and equipping organizations and their teams with skills to effectively work, advance in their career and education within and across multicultural diverse environment of military and civilian environment.  He has over 10 years extensive entrepreneurial practice as marketing director of two Asian Business association and owner of Mvoss Creation Promotional & Marketing. Tony has traveled in over 50 major cities around the world during his 23 years in the Navy as Human Resources Chief and still travelling every summer for leisure with his family. He conducts keynote speaking to diverse community of professional associations, university students, entrepreneurs and military organizations.  He was born to a Spanish mother and Filipino father and raised in the city of Manila, Philippines. He attended all his 12 years of education in an all-exclusive Chinese school. He joined the Navy and lived in Japan for 4 years and in the span of 23 years have been assigned and deployed in Europe, Middle East, Australia, Asia.  He resides in his home in Virginia Beach with his teenager son, wife Myla and a four-legged daughter corgi-mix Daisy.


References:

Holmes, S. & Kivlighan, D. (2000). Comparison of Therapeutic Factors in group and Individual Treatment Processes,” Journal of Counseling Psychology: pages 447-48.
  
Jacobs, E., Masson, R. L., & Harvill, R. L. (2008). Group Counseling: Strategies and Skills. New York: Brooks Cole.

Yalom, I. D. & Leszcz, M. (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books.


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Cultural Intelligence: What New Research Says and The Basic on How to Develop CQ to Enhance your Brand (Culture) in Career & Commerce




Dr. Tony Astro is co-owner of Mvoss Creation Promotional & Consulting located in Town Center Virginia Beach.  His expertise is cultural intelligence, career development and promotional branding. He has 2 decades of experience as human resources supervisor with Department of the Navy as Chief Counselor providing administrative support and training to all hierarchy and equipping organizations and their teams with skills to effectively work, advance in their career and education within and across multicultural diverse environment of military and civilian environment.  He has over 10 years extensive entrepreneurial practice as marketing director of two Asian Business association and owner of Mvoss Creation Promotional & Marketing. Tony has traveled in over 50 major cities around the world during his 23 years in the Navy as Human Resources Chief and still travelling every summer for leisure with his family. He conducts keynote speaking to diverse community of professional associations, university students, entrepreneurs and military organizations.  He was born to a Spanish mother and Filipino father and raised in the city of Manila, Philippines. He attended all his 12 years of education in an all-exclusive Chinese school. He joined the Navy and lived in Japan for 4 years and in the span of 23 years have been assigned and deployed in Europe, Middle East, Australia, Asia.  He resides in his home in Virginia Beach with his teenager son, wife Myla and a four-legged daughter corgi-mix Daisy.

Cultural Intelligence is the next Intelligence after EQ and IQ
“Knowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power. If you realize that you have enough, you are truly rich” - Lao Tzu
Fortune 500 companies anticipate their highest revenue streams over the next decade to come from global and emerging business (Fortune, 2016) and top universities are recruiting students from around the world and from groups previously underrepresented on their campuses (Graduate employability: top universities in the United States ranked by employers 2017).
According to the recent Virginia Beach Community Profile, over 40 Foreign companies gave emerged in our city.  Our city is turning global and each many local companies like Sentara or United States Navy have a group of multicultural employees.  That is why Cultural Intelligence (Not Diversity) have a new place in how we deal our daily lives.   And it starts with knowing our own culture before knowing others, like Lao Tzu said, “Knowing others is Intelligence”.
Cultural Intelligence is our ability to adapt to unfamiliar cultural settings. Peter Earley and Elaine Mosakowski defined cultural intelligence (CQ) as the skill to “tease out of a person’s or group’s behavior those features that would be true of all people and all groups, those unusual to this person or this group, and those that are neither universal nor distinctive.” (Earley & Mosakowski, 2004).
As an immigrant, I am considered multi-culture but not even closed to being high in cultural intelligence even after living in various countries:  half of my later life in the United States and my beginning life in the first 2 decades living in the Philippines.  What really helped me is my past 23 years in the Navy working under the human resources but that is just half of what we need to say we have a good sense of CQ.
I strongly believe and based on many peer reviewed research that cultural intelligence (CQ) plays an important role in day-to-day life (just look at your social media page how many foreigners we encounter) and that CQ has a factor managing conflict for increased productivity and performance in diverse international or national environments.
Today's corporate environments (not just international) demand that employees are culturally intelligent for effective engagement in cross-cultural interactions. The recent study below examines the moderating effect of cultural intelligence (CQ) in the relationship between individual cultural orientations and the choice of a conflict management design.

Mindfulness and Motivation
Leaders who are culturally intelligent have mindfulness of how culture contributes to communication and creates shared learning (Darlington, 1996).  Cultural intelligence (CQ or CI) has often been linked to performance at the individual, team, and firm levels as a key factor in international business success Alon, Boulanger, Elston, Galanaki, Martínez de Ibarreta, & Meyers 2016)
The key in having a high cultural intelligence is mindfulness and experience.  Knowing your own culture is the very first step.  Actively working and applying cultural intelligence values enables us to learn more about ourselves and our relationship to the world.  Being mindful in our journeys can bring fulfilling transformation.  Study shows that cross‐cultural adjustment experiences, particularly in the social domain, play an important role in influencing CQ (Chao, Takeuchi, & Farh, 2016).
Intercultural social contact in daily life, and cultural intelligence (CQ) are positively related to strong motivation according to research.  Results of structural equation of data from 370 students supported all the suggestions in this study based on their student’s international travel experience, intercultural social contact in daily life, and cultural intelligence (CQ) are positively related to willingness or motivation (Lee, Weber, & Rivera Jr, 2018).

Social Interaction and Social Media
A recent research finding show that socializing or social media usage strengthens the relationship between multicultural experiences and cultural intelligence, whereas informational social media usage does not strengthen such relationship (Hu, Gu, Liu, & Huang, 2017).  The need of such a skill can be attributed to the fact that organizations are now blending out their human side of dealing with their employees when it comes to ensuring that they interact or socialized in the organization with ease (Maheshkar, Chandan, and Vinod Sharma, 2018).  
Acquiring a workforce which possesses high cultural intelligence can be a tough task; however, training staffs to become culturally competent can be a doable task. Like any other personality trait which can be imbibed over time through constant analysis and observation, cultural fitness is one such area which may be refined through various methodologies and practices.  Increased interactions among individuals from different cultural backgrounds in domestic organizational contexts points to another vast population who can benefit from CQ development (Ott, & Michailova, 2016).


Branding
Achieving branding appeal and competitiveness is a major priority of many companies including most marketing managers. They must implement new strategies that are distinct from those of their competitors and that influence client or customer’s perceptions, attitudes and behaviors and reinforce the brand equity of the product.  Using a sample of 503 tourists visiting Spain, the study demonstrates that a tourist’s CQ influences their assessment of destination brand equity (Frías-Jamilena, Sabiote-Ortiz, Martín-Santana, & Beerli-Palacio, 2018).

Balance, Flexible & Healthy Life
Since culture drives behavior the individual, the organizations, and the society, it is proposed that if we create a culture that supports work-life balance, it is likely to promote sustainable human development though higher role-related engagement of individuals. Research suggested that cultural intelligence plays a significant role in attaining both work-life stability and maintainable human growth (Rao, 2017).

Cultural Intelligence is the ability to work in balance and successfully with groups of people from any culture.  Someone with a high Cultural IQ can be released into a culture they know nothing about and will be able to balance, observe, empathize, and be flexible enough to form relationships with people, even if they are incapable to express the language.

Success in Leadership, Business, School and Organization
Successful organizations involve people that can link the digital gap, steer an ever-changing and often ambiguous setting, and deal with the expected culture shock that swift changes in today’s global world brings. These are the leadership behaviors that matter, and being able to use technology, rather than ending up being used by technology must be our goal as group leaders (Thomson & Emmens, 2018)
By examining 189 international students from an Australian university, this study investigates the impact of CQ and cultural exposure on intercultural adjustment and academic performance (Iskhakova, 2018).
More research also revealed total cultural intelligence score was positively and significantly correlated with job satisfaction.  This recent 2018 research indicate that leaders of public accounting firms might consider using cultural intelligence and the behavioral factor of cultural intelligence as a tool in the selection and recruitment of new accountants to address the problem of accounting firms retaining adequate number of accounting professional to meet current demand and to grow the firm if needed (McKinley Jr, 2018)

Basic Ways in Developing Higher Cultural Intelligence
Soft skills and team-building tracks combined with content that emphases on cultural diversity are helpful starts to the unlearning progression and developing a higher CQ, but mastery comes from practice (Levychin, 2018).    Being mindful or finding a common ground and constant interaction is a great start when dealing with human interaction every day is a great start but here are just a few ways to start our CQ growing. 


1.   Learn a New Culture Every day.    Be curious and start being mindful of why and how others react in certain behavior.  Travel and meeting someone different is a great way to learn a new culture.  Being aware of your surroundings is an option if you cannot afford to travel outside your country, anywhere in the city, you will find someone who grew up in a different culture than yours – get to know them.

2.  Show them Your Culture and Show them You Appreciate their Culture.  Don’t just tell them you understand why they did that, accept it then talk about how that is just perfectly normal, and you know someone (if you really do, always be honest) that have similar gestures, attitude or behavior and that being different is amazing.

3.  Awareness & Be Open Minded.  Don’t just put yourself in other people’s situations but learn how and why they behave such way.  Attend multi-cultural meetup or networking such as FusionMeet Networking (in Coastal Virginia) where everyone is introduced according to their culture or ethnicity even though everyone is an American, there is a cultural behavior that we practice everyday that is developed from our home, passed down by our parents who may have a different culture.  Although we based many behaviors in one culture, we should NEVER stereotype certain behavior as everyone have individual culture or personality. 

These are just basic in many ways to develop our CQ.    The main key is to collect as many “repertoire” or pockets of experience and explore each knowledge to start a deeper understanding of everyone you encounter.  Constant travelling, meeting people outside our comfort zone, learning a new language are some daily activities we can increase to foster a stronger intelligence in culture.


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Top Ten Techie Travel Tips to your Europe Trip



Here are 10 random summer technology tips if you are travelling to Europe (Or how sometimes I can call: Ways to Increase your European Cultural Intelligence - CQ). Bottomline, use technology to your advantage. Except for car rental and Eurail trip, this blog did not focus much on Pre-Travel (such as Airfare but I used Kayak for many years now to help me get the best fare).

1. I've tried many travel apps but I always go back to Kayak to search for the best car-rental rate (also for airfare) no less than 2 months before you travel (although you can get lucky on last minute deals so always check the actual company and don't book on Kayak). If you get the Europcar (usually the best rate even if you have Hertz member rate) ask for one way drop off specials. Summer 2017, my family spent 30 days driving a roomy midsize Skoda one way from Seville Spain to Switzerland then drop off to Barcelona and pay only $600 unlimited mileage (we drove about 6,500 miles around 5 countries). Use the airport car rentals, they are usually generous with upgrade specially if you have a high CQ and nice personality with high EQ, Emotional Quotient (just a non-techie tip there).


2. Road App: Google Maps and Google Trips (download the guide for each cities) and use the route, if you happen to be driving that area, Google trip will give you real suggestions, no more "Oh, we've pass that, we could've seen the Nimes or Vevey or Porto". It will save you another trip.


3. Use T-Mobile Unlimited Global (it's free and if you are veteran, you get even further discount). We were streaming YouTube music, TuneIn Podcast (Daily Hope) along the highway and fast Internet with no surprises in your bill.

4. Lodging App: Airbnb: Increase your Cultural Intelligence by living with locals, you will be surprised how accommodating almost everyone was. Except that mansion we rented in Barcelona (creepy), so read the reviews carefully. Avoid newly posted spaces. (Insert are from our 2014 Europe road trip / Eurail, meeting these locals who opened their homes to us, at half the cost of a hotel and maybe increased our Cultural Quotient)

5. Consider Eurail pass if only two or less are travelling (we did get a 21 day Global in 2013 for 3 of us - we learned a lesson). They have 35% off now until June 4 (about $700-ish each unlimited ride for a month). Good only if you travel light and don't mind hopping in and out with your luggage from one bus or train station to another. You still have to make a reservation, but you don’t have to worry about parking and going to major cities and it's kind of romantic or dramatic as you bump to many locals travelling, especially in local trains (which is included in your Global Pass).

6. Use your MC/Visa/Amex credit card (with chip or Android Pay, always tell the cashier to use US $ rate) rather than carry more than $50 or Euro cash. Most cards have insurance (cars and buyer protection) so it will give you peace of mind (Remember Travelers Check?).


7. Connect with your social media (Facebook) friends who are already in Europe way ahead of time. Give them a clue you are coming so they can plan and offer a "gift from America". They sure will appreciate it in exchange for a hospitality tour. Now you will discover who your real friends are.

8. Take a photo of all your IDs, Passports on your phone and upload them on your Amazon or Google Cloud, just in case.


9. Remember most people in famous cities are tourists, increases your real cultural intelligence and mindfulness by visiting suburb malls and buy your souvenirs in supermarket (like Aldi, Lidl, Carrefour, Migros, Tesco).  Some of their Food Courts are high quality (El Corte Ingles in Spain is all over).  You will be amazed how people from different countries eat and buy stuff. Cheap food, cheap souvenirs. Never buy in tourist areas.   (Photo insert shows El Corte Ingles Supermarket Japanese food court)

10. Take video clips (5-10 seconds) besides taking selfies to create real life - hearing the laugh, people's accent and musical memories that will connect you back in time. 



I hope you enjoy this Tech Trip to Europe Trip (Ways to Increase your European Cultural Intelligence - CQ). Successful travel may not need a high IQ, but a high EQ will help and a high CQ add to your advantage.

Now these tips are random and not all based on research, but lessons learned. Do you have additional 10 or just one tip we can use this upcoming holiday?



Dr. Tony Astro’s expertise is cultural intelligence, career development and promotional branding. He has 2 decades of experience as human resources supervisor with Department of the Navy as Chief Counselor providing administrative support and training to all hierarchy and equipping organizations and their teams with skills to effectively work, advance in their career and education within and across multi-cultural diverse environment of military and civilian environment. He has over 10 years extensive entrepreneurial practice as marketing director of two Asian Business association and owner of Mvoss Creation Promotional & Marketing.  Tony has traveled in over 50 major cities around the world during his 23 years in the Navy and every summer for leisure with his family. He conducts keynote speaking to diverse community of professional associations, university students, entrepreneurs and military organizations.
He was born to a Spanish mother and Filipino father and raised in the city of Manila, Philippines. He attended all his 12 years of education in an all-exclusive Chinese school. He joined the Navy and lived in Japan for 4 years and in the span of 23 years have been assigned and deployed in Europe, Middle East, Australia, Asia. 





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How Being Mindful and Cultural Curiosity Connects your Career, Cause and Commerce




A Brief Lecture on Keys to Develop Cultural Intelligence by Dr. Tony Astro

  • Curiosity, Capture and Conscious
People read, watch movies, travel and do their obsession because we are fixated or fascinated about it. That is curiosity. We are driven by our passion, our interest. We snoop into something because we are curious about something until we become wary or conscious about our own culture because there is someone out there that is different than us.
We start to pry, snoop and become nosy about something so we can reach and achieve them or at least get to know them.  We start to capture some details every chance that we can on our newfound curiosity and in this blog we will focus on culture, in this case defined by Merriam Webster as the customs, arts, social institutions, and achievements of a particular nation, people, or other social group including the attitudes and behavior characteristic of a particular social group.
 If we really enjoy our travel, we become curious on certain culture or something unfamiliar to us. This sometimes develop into inquisitiveness that motivates us to go further into the next level: Collect and Click.

  • Collect and Click
Now we start collecting ideas, read books about what we were curious about. We surf the internet and social media and join certain Facebook groups and comment on discussions, purchase gadget on Amazon to expand our new curiosity or just binge on Netflix for a new series that captured our imagination.
This not only applies to travel but our encounter with other groups of people, a certain personality or a YouTube that we stumbled upon. After we have seen them, we want to see it live, touch them, taste them and meet them, so we go further: Connect and Create


  •  Connect and Create
As business owners, we learn that networking is valuable to get our leads. So, we connect with organizations like Chamber of Commerce, BNI, BizConnect, Marketing Associations in our case. But it does not stop there. After two years of connecting, as passionate as we are in our business, we even go further, not because we don’t get our leads but as entrepreneurs, we like to experiment – create buzz or create products or create a group.
In the span of two years we connected to at least 5 local organizations as members and created new products and services to sustain or increase our bottom line. After being exposed to many diverse personality and multi-cultural group, we develop awareness then became more sociable as we were exposed and immersed in different behaviors and personalities with multiple “brand” or culture. But we can never be fully developed or increase in our cultural intelligence or personal brand if we don’t: cultivate and commit.



  •  Cultivate and Create
Being raised in certain culture does not make us an expert unless we really know our culture and be aware of a different one other than ours.  I can attest to that as a Filipino who lived in the Philippines for 25 years. Not until I went to live to another culture that I became more aware that I was different, and I need to cultivate my new American culture that I only see in movies. 
We can connect with others but if we don’t nurture this new connections or newfound relationship by being attentive to them, we cannot create that deep affiliation or bond that is a much-needed quality in a business or personal relationship. This rapport with others is the bond needed to make a better negotiation, enhance communication and success in more lasting connection that would rally into our goals and personal success in our: career, commerce and chosen causes.


  • Career, Commerce and Community
As a 20-year human resources supervisor and career counselor and a 10-year entrepreneur who lead a promotional branding company and two minority (Asian Business) group, I would like to focus on personal branding (career), marketing or business (commerce) and our ultimate cause, to serve others (community)– something that we would like to share as our ultimate legacy – as a way of giving back to the community.
Our identity is shape by our parents, family, belief, groups – that is our culture. Like a famous shoe who (or what) is known to have a quality of comfort and design, it was develop through many research, marketing analysis, presented in different platform of advertising until it becomes known as Nike.

We have our own swoop, box or logo through how we dress or present ourselves to the public. Our status or reputation was developed through marriage, current position, education. Certain brands are only sold in certain areas, that is branding. What company we worked for or school we graduated or credentials we have tells about our personal branding. What we share in Facebook or photos we post on Instagram and videos we liked on YouTube give clues to “who we are” or what our brand is.
I was involved in many Filipino, Asian, military organizations and events because of how I was shaped and / or how I look like. I was invited to speak, join or attend those groups because of my affiliations. But as we become more aware of other culture (nation, country, military, millennial, LGBT, senior citizens, etc.) through curiosity, collection, connection, cultivation and creation – we become a stronger adherent to other groups, expanding our prospect for success in business and further realization of our ultimate goals in life and more avenues to share them to other culture other than ours.

  • Culture and Class (our Brand)
 Being mindful of our culture or brand is the very first step in cultural intelligence. Deliberately knowing where we came from and being expressive about it and discerning of others makes us more mindful and the beginning of appreciating and understanding that we are different. But then we become shrewd and perceptive of others. A common phrase, “I treat everyone the same” is not an excuse to be unbiased and fairness. It is an expression of disinterest and detachment to reality.   It is not an excuse to being open-minded or balance but a show of unfamiliarity and obliviousness.


Dr. Tony Astro’s expertise is cultural intelligence, career development and promotional branding. He has 2 decades of experience as human resources supervisor with Department of the Navy as Chief Counselor providing administrative support and training to all hierarchy and equipping organizations and their teams with skills to effectively work, advance in their career and education within and across multi-cultural diverse environment of military and civilian environment. He has over 10 years extensive entrepreneurial practice as marketing director of two Asian Business association and owner of Mvoss Creation Promotional & Marketing.  Tony has traveled in over 50 major cities around the world during his 23 years in the Navy and every summer for leisure with his family. He conducts keynote speaking to diverse community of professional associations, university students, entrepreneurs and military organizations.

He was born to a Spanish mother and Filipino father and raised in the city of Manila, Philippines. He attended all his 12 years of education in an all-exclusive Chinese school. He joined the Navy and lived in Japan for 4 years and in the span of 23 years have been assigned and deployed in Europe, Middle East, Australia, Asia. 




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